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Welcome to Model Train Time. This site is for model train lovers of all levels. We hope to build a community of enthusiasts that will gain knowledge and share the knowledge that they have. Model trains help to bring generations together and return us to a much simpler time when families worked together to create

The smallest practical model railroading scale was also developed in Germany. Toy manufacturer Marklin released the first Z scale (1:220) model trains in 1972, assigned the last letter of the alphabet since it was assumed no smaller trains could be made! When these trains were later imported to America, they were first dismissed as a novelty. However,

The first N scale (1:160) model trains were produced in Germany in 1962, but would not make their debut in America until 1967 when Aurora introduced their line of “Postage Stamp Trains.” The designation “N” is short for “nine,” referring to the 9mm gauge between the rails of N scale track. While these early efforts were crude

HO scale (1:87) made its first appearance in Europe before becoming popular in the United States in the mid-1930s. The abbreviation “HO” stands for “half-O.” The smaller trains were less expensive and took up less space than their larger O scale cousins, which became popular with people who were moving into small homes and apartments in

The period between the first and second World Wars saw the rise of smaller model trains, starting with S scale (1:64) in the 1930s, popularized by American Flyer Trains (made by A.C. Gilbert Co.). These trains became popular because they ran on more realistic-looking two-rail track instead of the three-rail system used by competitor Lionel. While many

At the turn of the last century, Lionel was the first to produce electric toy trains in America in what they called “Standard Gauge,” where the rails were 2.125″ apart. After the first World War, the smaller O scale (1:48) became the popular size for toy train manufacturers in America. Many toy train sets run on three-rail

G scale trains were introduced by Lehmann Grosse Bahn (which translates into “Lehmann Big Trains”) in the 1960s. Because of its size and durability, these rugged toy trains are often used in outdoor garden railways, where hobbyists combine their love of trains with beautiful gardens and real scenic elements such as ponds and waterfalls. While the